How Can a Wine and Cheese Party Lower Your Blood Pressure?

A wine and cheese party can be a fun way to relax and make new friends. It’s also a great way to lower your blood pressure. Cheese and wine parties are great for large get-togethers. Make it lots of fun by having every guest bring a bottle of wine and an exotic cheese. It’s a fantastic way to try new wines and cheeses … and a perfect conversation starter. A cheese and wine party is also the perfect way to relax … both yourself and your arteries. Wine is good for lowering blood pressure … and so is cheese. A Glass of Red Wine Red wine contains a protective antioxidant — the flavonol called resveratrol. This powerful antioxidant protects your …

Should You Drink Red Wine?

You definitely should consider drinking red wine if you drink alcohol. Considering the health benefits of red wine and how enjoyable the experience can be, I think that red wine is the logical choice for the drinker. Let us begin by looking at the health benefits of red wine. To understand these benefits requires a short explanation: Red wines are a rich source of biologically active compounds known as phytochemicals, which are chemicals found in plants. In particular, phytochemicals called polyphenols are found in red wine. Two polyphenols in red wine are catechins and resveratrol, both of which are antioxidants. Antioxidants are any substance that reduces oxidative damage (damage due to oxygen such as that caused by free radicals). Free …

A Little Red Wine Could Take You A Long Way!

Longevity interests a lot of people who aren’t ready to give up their lives, just yet, and who look to healthy alternatives to culturally defined eating patterns and “health care.” The benefits of drinking wine have been touted for a while and are thought, by some, to be the reason why the French can get away with eating a high fat diet while enjoying a low rate of coronary disease. A few years ago, a study by French research team also found that men who regularly drank at least two glasses of wine daily were 50 percent less likely than non-drinkers to suffer a second heart attack. Previous studies with yeast, a small species of worm, and fruit flies have …