Tea: Drinking Jasmine Tea

Jasmine tea is the most popular variety of flavored tea. This is, in part because Jasmine has been used to scent and flavor every variety of tea: white, black, green and oolong. So, no matter your preference in tea, there is a Jasmine tea for you. Jasmine tea dates back to the Sung Dynasty. To make this delicious blend, tea artisans plucked jasmine blossoms just as they were beginning to open. Then the petals were stored in a cool place until nightfall, when the blossoms began to release their fragrance. They were then added to dry green tea leaves, to allow the dry tea leaves to absorb the fragrance. Ordinary grades of tea were scented two or three times; the …

Tea: How Is White Tea Graded?

White tea has become a very popular drink in recent years. Though it’s been grown at least as far back as the Tang Dynasty (618-907 A.D.), it is a new beverage to most people in the Western world. Later, during the Song Dynasty (960-1279) the emperor Hui Zhong declared white tea to be the most elegant form of tea, and this declaration made white tea more popular and increased the number of tea gardens growing the variety. During this same dynasty, a new method of white tea preparation emerged, known as the Song method. Prior to this, white tea leaves were processed into cakes and prepared by boiling pieces of the tea cake in kettles. During the Song Dynasty, white …

Tea: How Is Jasmine Tea Different From Other Teas?

If you’re a tea drinker, it’s likely that you’ve tried jasmine tea. Jasmine tea is the most popular blend of Chinese tea, and has been produced for more than 700 years. It was first produced during the Sung dynasty, by plucking the jasmine leaves as soon as they begin to bloom. The freshly plucked jasmine leaves were stored in a cool place until nightfall, when the blossoms began to release their fragrance. Then the jasmine petals were added to dry heaps of tea leaves, to allow the dry tea leaves to absorb the fragrance. Ordinary grades were scented two or three times; the special grades even more. Today, the process is much the same, though it may not be carried …