The Anatomy Of A Coffee Tree

Coffea, a member of the Rubiaceae family is responsible for the biological heritage of “coffee.” The Rubiaceae family includes more than 500 genera and 6,000 species of tropical trees and shrubs. It is doubtful the average person would recognize an actual coffee tree. Most of us would recognize a roasted coffee bean. Just in case you stumble upon something you think might be a real coffee tree, here is a quick description of one: •Pruned short in cultivation •Capable of growing more than 30 feet high •Generally covered with dark-green, waxy leaves that grow opposite each other in pairs, although a coffee tree can also have leaves that are purple or yellow (dark green is the predominant color) The leaves …

Have You Given A Thought To Where Your Cup Of Espresso Is Coming From?

The most amazing fact about the coffee beans is the trees having an expansion over 70 countries, from Brazil to Indonesia, still requiring a narrow range of conditions to produce those quality ‘beans’, while the total output remains small at large. ‘Beans’ as it is said so, is however a deliberate attempt to mark it in a single-quote, for the thing that gets ground and roasted to brew up the delicious drink is a seed and not a bean at all. The coffee tree, which can easily grow up to twenty feet or more than that, bears the fruits that contain the coffee seeds. However some wild varieties of coffee trees can grow to over 15m or 45 feet. Most …

10 Facts You Never Knew About Coffee

The next time you are at your favorite coffee shop and someone catches your eye, here are ten interesting coffee facts that you can use to break the ice: 1) Coffee is considered an aphrodisiac. Because it contains a high dose of caffeine and other various alkaloids, studies have shown that coffee can increase stamina and the overall length of intimate sessions. 2) Although coffee has been a part of the Arab culture for thousands of years, it did not become part of the western world until the 1500s. Before that time, priests believed that coffee was a drink of the devil. Pope Clement VIII finally ended this line of thinking by taking a sip of coffee and then giving …