Tea: What Are Good White Tea Blends

One of the most recent trends in Western tea drinking is white tea. Though white tea has been around for centuries, it has only recently become popular outside of the Asian world. And, even in China and Japan, where most white tea is grown, it was traditionally reserved for special occasions because of its rarity. Today, however, tea drinkers all over the world are enjoying white tea more and more. White tea comes from the same plant as other teas, the camellia sinensis. But, it is harvested before the leaves are fully open and while the buds are still covered with fine white hair. This makes the tea leaves much mellower, resulting in a much milder tea than black and …

Tea: The Best Green Tea Blends

Green tea is fast becoming one of the hottest ways to look after your health. More and more research is surfacing that suggests that drinking green tea may be one of the simplest things you can do to live a longer and healthier life. Green tea is special because of the way that it’s processed. Though it comes from the same plant as black tea, it is produced in an entirely different way. During processing, black tea is allowed to oxidize, or ferment. Green tea however, is simply dried and then steamed or fired to prevent the oxidation process from occurring. It sounds like a simple difference, but it causes some very powerful differences between the two types of tea. …

Tea: Drinking Green Tea

The art of brewing and drinking green tea has been around for centuries. In fact, green tea has been used for many different tea ceremonies in China and Japan. In these countries, there are rituals that must be followed and tools that must be used in brewing tea to be served to guests. The Japanese tea ceremony, for example, is steeped in tradition, and is still used to celebrate special occasions today. The tea traditionally used for a Japanese tea ceremony is called Macha, a powdered green tea. In Japan, emphasis is placed on the ceremony itself, rather than the taste of the tea. Today’s Japanese tea ceremonies typically last about 45 minutes, but in years past a tea ceremony …